5 Ways to Meet an INFJ

At just 1.5% of the US population, INFJs can be hard to find. Some of us will go our entire lives without running into one! But if you’re bound and determined to encounter this, the rare blue diamond of personality types, here are some ways to increase your chances.

1. Try Some World Travel

A survey of English-speaking Canadians found the population be nearly 4% INFJ, more than twice the frequency in the United States. Another survey found 2.4% of adults in Korea were INFJs. The highest percentage of all, though, was found in New Zealand, where 5% of the people surveyed were INFJs.

Population distribution of INFJ personality type in different countries

Depending on your budget for INFJ-hunting, though, you may want a cheaper option. Or how about a free one?

2. Visit the Library

In one national survey, INFJs composed 6.5% of librarians, quadrupling your odds of running into an INFJ when you’re lurking among the stacks.

INFJ is a common personality type among librarians

3. Head to Church

INFJs are found in disproportionately high numbers in many religious occupations, including priests, nuns, and religious educators.

INFJs often choose religious occupations such as ministry

Organized religion not your thing? Perhaps you’d prefer to take in some culture instead. Why don't you...

4. Go to a Museum

INFJs are more likely than other types to say that one of their favorite hobbies is appreciating art. Spot them standing in front of an exhibit, deeply lost in contemplation.

Still INFJ-less? Feeling a bit desperate? It might be time to...

5. Seek Counseling

INFJs are found in high percentages among therapists and psychologists. They are also the personality type most likely to cope with stress by talking to a professional--so even if your therapist isn’t an INFJ, you might meet one in the waiting room.

INFJs often choose helping careers such as counselor, psychologist, or social worker

 

 

Sources

The data cited in this article is from the MBTI Manual by Isabel Briggs Myers, Mary H. McCaulley, Naomi L. Quenk, and Allen L. Hammer, and the Atlas of Type Tables by Gerald P. Macdaid, Mary H. McCaulley, and Richard I. Kainz.

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