How to Succeed as an Introverted Trainer

You’re telling the room: any type can do anything. Personality theory is about understanding yourself better, playing to your strengths and broadening your horizons. It was never intended to pigeonhole anyone.

On the inside, you’re thinking. How can I, someone with a preference for Introversion, train groups of people as my job? My energy comes from in-depth, one-on-one conversations, not noise-filled, overstimulating group work. I’m much happier working and spending time alone.

Six Ways Personality Testing Can Boost Your Staff Retention

Losing even one employee can be a huge loss to your business. Not only do you lose a valuable pair of hands, you potentially lose a chunk of experience that’s difficult to replace. Productivity declines, and morale may take a hit across the wider workforce, especially if you are left understaffed. These factors can have devastating effects on everything from leadership to service quality and of course, the bottom line.

Still, what can you do to keep employees?

How to Deliver Bad News to Good People

Maybe you have to inform your star performer that she won’t be getting a well-deserved raise. Or perhaps you have to tell your team that projects are cancelled and people are being laid off. How do break news like that? What do you say?

One thing is for sure: you cannot not communicate. Ignoring the problem won’t make it go away and leaving things to the rumor mill won’t win respect for your leadership skills. Here’s how to make a bad news experience more positive, both for you and for the employees you’re addressing.

8 Easy Ice Breakers For Your Personality Workshop

Do you want to warm-up your employees for a morning’s team building or personality workshop event? Then be sure to include some fun-and-inclusive ice breakers. Done properly, they are a terrific way to get people interested in the activity and relax before getting to the nitty-gritty of personality theory. They are also helpful for getting people to come to the party dressed as themselves and demonstrate the value of the Briggs and Myers framework to people who may be skeptical about it.

So You're an Idealist With a Rational Boss. How Do You Communicate?

Like him or tolerate him, your boss plays a big part in your life. He is single-handedly responsible for your day-to-day happiness at work, and he could also influence your job opportunities throughout the rest of your career. Obviously, there’s a far greater chance that your boss will open rather than close doors for you if you make the effort to get along.

That’s harder to practice than it is to preach.

The 4 Types of Stressed-Out Employees—and How to Help Them

No matter what you do for a living, or how well organized and managed your workplace is, at some point, your employees will feel stressed. That's not necessarily a bad thing. A little stress can help us stay energetic, focused, and able to meet new challenges in the workplace. It's only when stress exceeds a person's ability to cope that it becomes a problem.

Could Personality Assessment Reveal Unexpected Leaders?

There is an increasing body of evidence showing that diversity matters, especially when it comes from the top. Leadership teams of varying gender, ethnic and racial makeup perform better financially, experience less employee turnover, and have better customer orientation than their less diverse counterparts. They are also better at recruiting top talent, which leads to a cycle of increasing returns.

Here's Why You Shouldn't Ignore the Workplace Neurotic

Read the literature about the Big-Five Personality Theory, and you may end up baffled how those scoring highly for the trait of neuroticism are able to get through the working day. Characterized by insecurity, anxiety, irritability, oversensitivity and sadness, there is evidence to suggest that neurotics are poor team players who have a weakened ability to focus for sustained periods of time. These traits are not associated with success in the workplace.

Is Your Team Suffering from Collaboration Overload?

Collaboration is no longer a nice-to-have, it's an organizational structure that defines our work environments. Whether we're talking about cross-functional teams, silos breaking down, virtual meeting rooms, huddles, stand-ups, or the myriad technologies that boost teamwork, collaboration has never been more essential to operations. The team - not the individual - is the secret to business success. 

7 Things You Should Not Do With A Lone Wolf Employee

There are two types of employees: those who thrive in a team environment, and those who would rather work alone. Though these two groups can work together cohesively when they need to, they typically accomplish much more when allowed to do things their own way.

5 Tips for Painlessly Scaling Your Team

The problem of scaling a team is tough to crack. How do you add more members without breaking the spirit of the existing members? At what point do the old ways of doing things stop working? How can you be sure that the team is scaling at the right rate and in the right way? Success can turn on a small detail, such as a personality clash or one outdated process. What should a team leader do to avoid messing up?

How to Talk About Mistakes (So You Can All Just Move On)

To improve future performance, teams must learn from their mistakes. Despite being an irrefutable truth, few teams do this well. This is not due to a lack of willingness on their part - most organizations devote countless hours to after-action reviews, project postmortems and similar analysis to help the team reflect on what it did wrong and avoid similar mistakes in the future. More often than not, these actions fail to drive any real change in future outcomes.

When Your Team is Remote, Does Personality Even Matter?

Understanding the various personalities on your team is important for getting people working together in the way you'd like. That is why so many organizations use the personality assessment created by Katharine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers when putting together effective teams. Personality assessment tools can help select the right team members - people who are likely to bond, innovate, and follow through on the company's goals such that the output of the team is greater than that of its constituent members.

5 Things Team Leaders Should Focus on First

One of the most challenging work transitions comes when you face the prospect of leading a new team for the first time. Getting people to work together is not easy, and many team leaders rush over the basics in order to start achieving goals. But the first weeks and months are critical for starting a team off on the right foot. What actions should you take to set the team up for success? How will you get the team working well together, manage conflict, and create an environment where everyone feels safe, valued and motivated to contribute?

Why Every Team Needs a Pecking Order

When putting together a team, conventional wisdom dictates that you strive for a mix of personalities and do whatever it takes to build equality within the group. Inequality of status - where it's pretty clear how everyone ranks compared to their peers - discourages people from sharing ideas and can lead to people feeling undervalued or disrespected. These hot human emotions distract teammates from their tasks and can disrupt even the most focused performers.

Or so the theory goes.

The Personality Traits Most Favored By Hiring Managers (And Why It's Bad News For Your Teams)

There's something rotten in the state of recruiting. When a candidate looks at a job ad, they would be forgiven for thinking that all employers are looking for people with a specific list of skills  - 10 years' experience within an S&P 500 company/advanced understanding of technology platforms/specific industry certifications/proven track record of managing large teams.

What Works (and What Doesn't) When it Comes to Cultivating Trust in Teams

Time and again, strong levels of trust in teams have been shown to build employee engagement, enhance customer loyalty, and drive profit growth. When team members have a high level of trust in leaders and each other, the group becomes notably better at achieving business goals.

Is This The One Trait That Makes Teams More Productive?

What is the secret of productive teams? For the longest time, Google believed that the best teams consisted of the smartest people who got on with each other. But an observation of 180 of its internal teams provided a surprising result: the "who" didn't actually matter. There was nothing showing that a mix of skills, backgrounds or specific personality types made any difference.

How to Learn the Art of Productive Disagreement

Differing opinions, divergent viewpoints, and conflicting ideas are healthy and central to progress. They broaden our perspectives, stretch our minds, and help us to arrive at the best possible strategy and practices. Research suggests that constructive disagreement is enormously important to the success of a team. It increases participation in decision making, encourages collaboration, reduces anxiety, and results in better choices and more creative thinking. If you want the best to come out of your teams, it pays to establish a conflict culture.