ENFJs are idealist organizers, driven to implement their vision of what is best for humanity. They often act as catalysts for human growth because of their ability to see potential in other people and their charisma in persuading others to their ideas. They are focused on values and vision, and are passionate about the possibilities for people.

ENFJs are typically energetic and driven, and often have a lot on their plates. They are tuned into the needs of others and acutely aware of human suffering; however, they also tend to be optimistic and forward-thinking, intuitively seeing opportunity for improvement. The ENFJ is ambitious, but their ambition is not self-serving: rather, they feel personally responsible for making the world a better place.

ENFJ in the Population

ENFJ is one of the less common types in the population, especially for men. Among men, ENFJ is the second rarest type. ENFJs make up:

  • 3% of the general population
  • 3% of women
  • 2% of men

Famous ENFJs

Famous ENFJs include Oprah Winfrey, Pope John Paul II, Margaret Mead, Ralph Nader, Abraham Maslow, Dr. Phil McGraw, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Motivating the ENFJ

ENFJs are driven by a deep sense of altruism and empathy for other people. They have an intuitive sense of the emotions of others, and often act as an emotional barometer for the people around them. However, their compassion not reserved for the people close to them: they are often humanitarian in nature, and may feel genuine concern for the ills of the entire human race. They tend to personally experience the feelings of others, and feel compelled to act when they see people suffering.

ENFJs want close, supportive connections with others, and believe that cooperation is the best way to get things done. They like to be liked and are very sensitive to feedback, both positive and negative. They expect the best not just from themselves, but from others as well, and may find themselves disappointed when others are not as genuine in their intentions as the ENFJ. ENFJs work hard to maintain strong relationships, and strive to be valuable members of their families, groups, and communities.

Recognizing the ENFJ

ENFJs are natural teachers, often found organizing people to take part in some educational activity. They tend to take charge of a situation, and guide a group towards those activities and experiences which will help them learn and grow. They intuitively see the potential in people, and with charisma and warmth, they encourage others to pursue greater development of their strengths. They are typically dynamic and productive, and are often visibly energized when leading others to discover new knowledge.

ENFJs are typically good communicators, talented at using words to connect with others. They are perceptive about people and enjoy talking about relationships. They often enjoy helping others solve personal problems and like to share their insights about people, their emotions, and their motivations. They are empathetic sometimes to the point of being overinvolved, and can become exhausted if they are surrounded by too much negative emotion.

ENFJ at Work

At work, the ENFJ is motivated to organize others to implement positive change. ENFJs are enthusiastic problem-solvers, especially when they can put their strong intuition about people to good use.

ENFJs strive for cooperation and work best in a harmonious environment where they can support other people and encourage their growth. They often take on a mentor role, seeing their primary aim as helping other people become better at what they do.

ENFJs are often attracted to leadership roles; they naturally organize people to take advantage of their unique talents. They often have a strong vision in their work, and enjoy being able to use their creativity to develop innovative initiatives with a humanitarian focus. ENFJs appreciate teamwork, and they want to have the organizational resources to put their ideas into action.

The ideal work environment for an ENFJ is forward-thinking and people-centered, with a clear humanitarian mission and an emphasis on constructive action. The ideal job for an ENFJ allows them to develop and implement ideas that improve the circumstances and well-being of other people.

ENFJ on a Team

ENFJs are collaborative, inspirational team members who are interested in working together to implement plans for progress. ENFJ team members work from supportive relationships as their foundation; they are skilled at understanding the needs and priorities of others and talented at building consensus. ENFJs have a natural enthusiasm, and tend to engage their team members in their vision.

Because they are so oriented to cooperation, ENFJs can be ineffective on teams in conflict; they may become so engaged with trying to create harmony that they neglect to make an objective evaluation. Although they usually have a strong sense of purpose, they are more people-focused than task-focused, and will prioritize the growth and development of others throughout the process. ENFJs sometimes need to refocus on the task at hand, as they can spend so much time mentoring and encouraging others that they forget the team’s primary goal.

ENFJ as Leaders

In leadership posiitons, ENFJs are enthusiastic, supportive, and action-oriented. They are strong leaders with clear ideas about how to improve organizations to better serve the needs of people. ENFJs are confident in their mission, but often balance their goal orientation with a focus on interpersonal process. They seek cooperation, and want others on board, in action and in spirit. ENFJs often take on a mentorship role; they like to help their employees develop as workers and as people.

Although ENFJs typically enjoy leadership, they can become discouraged in environments with ongoing conflict. They have a deep need to be appreciated and can become drained and ineffective in positions where they are not able to elicit support for their ideas and values.